craigpeterlow:

American Flag, Great South Bay, Long Island, NY.

libutron:

Tubaria punicea 

It is a rare and beautiful mushroom in the Inocybaceae Family, recognized by a dark-red to reddish-purple cap, vinaceous gills that at maturity become ochre-brown to cinnamon-brown from spore deposit, and a vinaceous, fibrillose-striate stipe.

This species is known only from coastal regions of California, Oregon, and Washington, in the United States; fruiting from late fall to mid-winter.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©MaKeR i | Locality: unknown

fossilporn:

An early relative of the horse – Protorohippus venticolus – about the size of a large dog.  Green River Formation in Wyoming.

sizvideos:

Watch it in video
Follow our Tumblr

That bald eagle could obliterate that cat if it wanted to. I wouldn’t let my cats near a predator of that size, cats get picked off by birds of prey all the time.
sizvideos:

Watch it in video
Follow our Tumblr

That bald eagle could obliterate that cat if it wanted to. I wouldn’t let my cats near a predator of that size, cats get picked off by birds of prey all the time.
sizvideos:

Watch it in video
Follow our Tumblr

That bald eagle could obliterate that cat if it wanted to. I wouldn’t let my cats near a predator of that size, cats get picked off by birds of prey all the time.
sizvideos:

Watch it in video
Follow our Tumblr

That bald eagle could obliterate that cat if it wanted to. I wouldn’t let my cats near a predator of that size, cats get picked off by birds of prey all the time.

sizvideos:

Watch it in video

Follow our Tumblr

That bald eagle could obliterate that cat if it wanted to. I wouldn’t let my cats near a predator of that size, cats get picked off by birds of prey all the time.

bogleech:

bugcthulhu:

zooophagous:

astronomy-to-zoology:

Bat Tick (Carios kelleyi)
…a species of soft tick that is distributed throughout parts of North America, mainly Canada and the United States although it has also been found in Costa Rica. Like other soft ticks this species is a parasite of bats, as suggested by its name. Although they are also known to parasitize other animals including humans. Unlike other members of Argasidae C.kelleyi larvae are slow-feeding and take weeks to engorge.
Phylogeny
Animalia-Arthropoda-Chelicerata-Arachnida-Acari-Parasitiformes-Ixodida-Argasidae-Carios-C.kelleyi
Image(s): Keir Morse

Ticks are literally the worst animals

That is a terrible lie and YOU KNOW IT IN YOUR HEART

Some other bat ticks only feed on bat guano as adults, but their babies still need blood, and to stay safe, only feed intermittently.
Every day their mother carries them all up the wall of the cave, waits while they feed on a sleeping bat, then carries them all back down.
bogleech:

bugcthulhu:

zooophagous:

astronomy-to-zoology:

Bat Tick (Carios kelleyi)
…a species of soft tick that is distributed throughout parts of North America, mainly Canada and the United States although it has also been found in Costa Rica. Like other soft ticks this species is a parasite of bats, as suggested by its name. Although they are also known to parasitize other animals including humans. Unlike other members of Argasidae C.kelleyi larvae are slow-feeding and take weeks to engorge.
Phylogeny
Animalia-Arthropoda-Chelicerata-Arachnida-Acari-Parasitiformes-Ixodida-Argasidae-Carios-C.kelleyi
Image(s): Keir Morse

Ticks are literally the worst animals

That is a terrible lie and YOU KNOW IT IN YOUR HEART

Some other bat ticks only feed on bat guano as adults, but their babies still need blood, and to stay safe, only feed intermittently.
Every day their mother carries them all up the wall of the cave, waits while they feed on a sleeping bat, then carries them all back down.

bogleech:

bugcthulhu:

zooophagous:

astronomy-to-zoology:

Bat Tick (Carios kelleyi)

…a species of soft tick that is distributed throughout parts of North America, mainly Canada and the United States although it has also been found in Costa Rica. Like other soft ticks this species is a parasite of bats, as suggested by its name. Although they are also known to parasitize other animals including humans. Unlike other members of Argasidae C.kelleyi larvae are slow-feeding and take weeks to engorge.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Arthropoda-Chelicerata-Arachnida-Acari-Parasitiformes-Ixodida-Argasidae-Carios-C.kelleyi

Image(s): Keir Morse

Ticks are literally the worst animals

That is a terrible lie and YOU KNOW IT IN YOUR HEART

Some other bat ticks only feed on bat guano as adults, but their babies still need blood, and to stay safe, only feed intermittently.

Every day their mother carries them all up the wall of the cave, waits while they feed on a sleeping bat, then carries them all back down.

strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.

strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays

Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.

For All Your Yesterdayspaleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.

Art Credits:

Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.

H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx

Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths

Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus

Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.

Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)

Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves

Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers

These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.

Hey all

I’m a member at the cool Jurassic Park blog http://iheartjurassicpark.tumblr.com/ now!

Check it out. It’s cool.

elijahshandseight:

libutron:

Purple tarantula

This striking purple tarantula belongs to the genus Pamphobeteus (Theraphosidae), which comprises some of the largest spiders in the world.

Currently, there are ten species in the genus. They have neotropical distribution and most are voracious feeders and grow relatively fast, their appearance changing quite a lot as they grow.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Pablo Sebastián Padrón

Locality: Churute, Ecuador

A purple spider! How cool is that?

paleoillustration:

Dromaeosaur skull by Chris Alfaro | Tumblr
paleoillustration:

Dromaeosaur skull by Chris Alfaro | Tumblr
paleoillustration:

Dromaeosaur skull by Chris Alfaro | Tumblr

paleoillustration:

Dromaeosaur skull by Chris Alfaro | Tumblr

thobewill:

Therapods of North America: Acheroraptor temertyorum

A Hell Creek velociraptorine, depicted here in the winter, devouring a juvenile Thescelosaurus

I love snow paintings for some reason.

antediluvianechoes:

Blue Peacockidons, A. J. Trahan

This was the last afternoon the brothers would spend together. Their adult plumage was almost completely grown in: just a few gray-green plumes hung from frames becoming sleek and iridescent with vibrant blues that almost shone in the sunlight. 

The following day, the older one snapped at the younger. He whistled a territorial song—a tune that dipped low, then rose to end in three trill and angry notes—spread his arms and shook his great blue tail, fanning his feathers, trying to look as big and threatening as he could. 

The younger one was confused, not ready to be chased away. He cocked his head and chirped, then dodged his older brother’s kicks. He moved a few paces away, and the brother glared at him, sang “lu-ohn-a-ree-ee-ee” again. The younger one paced, keeping a few body-lengths between them, but edged too near, and his older brother was jumping again, lashing out with long, skinny, barb-tipped legs, mouth wide, feathers puffed. They croaked and chittered and rolled through the undergrowth, as if being tossed by the wind, one brother trying to climb on his sibling, the other spinning to stay out from under him. 

After this second attack, the younger one ran away—his brother scolding a few more territorial announcements behind him—and stopped only when he could no longer hear his brother. He inspected a scratch he’d received in the fight. Blood beaded between plumes. After nursing it, he looked around. The forest seemed larger than before.

ewilloughby:

I am now the proud owner of THE COOLEST custom iPhone 5S phone case that ever existed!
This beautiful case was laser-engraved by Carved.com, which is a quite lovely small business offering a variety of very high-quality real wood phone cases with an option for custom designs. The design is carved on redwood burl wood which has a gorgeous natural grain pattern.
The design is the famous Microraptor holotype, and more specifically is a stylized vector image created by my partner Jonathan (who is also an absolutely amazing dinosaur poet, so click on his gallery and check it out) in Illustrator. It will eventually be used as part of the cover for our upcoming anti-creationism book!
ewilloughby:

I am now the proud owner of THE COOLEST custom iPhone 5S phone case that ever existed!
This beautiful case was laser-engraved by Carved.com, which is a quite lovely small business offering a variety of very high-quality real wood phone cases with an option for custom designs. The design is carved on redwood burl wood which has a gorgeous natural grain pattern.
The design is the famous Microraptor holotype, and more specifically is a stylized vector image created by my partner Jonathan (who is also an absolutely amazing dinosaur poet, so click on his gallery and check it out) in Illustrator. It will eventually be used as part of the cover for our upcoming anti-creationism book!
ewilloughby:

I am now the proud owner of THE COOLEST custom iPhone 5S phone case that ever existed!
This beautiful case was laser-engraved by Carved.com, which is a quite lovely small business offering a variety of very high-quality real wood phone cases with an option for custom designs. The design is carved on redwood burl wood which has a gorgeous natural grain pattern.
The design is the famous Microraptor holotype, and more specifically is a stylized vector image created by my partner Jonathan (who is also an absolutely amazing dinosaur poet, so click on his gallery and check it out) in Illustrator. It will eventually be used as part of the cover for our upcoming anti-creationism book!
ewilloughby:

I am now the proud owner of THE COOLEST custom iPhone 5S phone case that ever existed!
This beautiful case was laser-engraved by Carved.com, which is a quite lovely small business offering a variety of very high-quality real wood phone cases with an option for custom designs. The design is carved on redwood burl wood which has a gorgeous natural grain pattern.
The design is the famous Microraptor holotype, and more specifically is a stylized vector image created by my partner Jonathan (who is also an absolutely amazing dinosaur poet, so click on his gallery and check it out) in Illustrator. It will eventually be used as part of the cover for our upcoming anti-creationism book!

ewilloughby:

I am now the proud owner of THE COOLEST custom iPhone 5S phone case that ever existed!

This beautiful case was laser-engraved by Carved.com, which is a quite lovely small business offering a variety of very high-quality real wood phone cases with an option for custom designs. The design is carved on redwood burl wood which has a gorgeous natural grain pattern.

The design is the famous Microraptor holotype, and more specifically is a stylized vector image created by my partner Jonathan (who is also an absolutely amazing dinosaur poet, so click on his gallery and check it out) in Illustrator. It will eventually be used as part of the cover for our upcoming anti-creationism book!

paleoillustration:

Dromaeosaurs by Jonathan Kuo
paleoillustration:

Dromaeosaurs by Jonathan Kuo
paleoillustration:

Dromaeosaurs by Jonathan Kuo
paleoillustration:

Dromaeosaurs by Jonathan Kuo
paleoillustration:

Dromaeosaurs by Jonathan Kuo

paleoillustration:

Dromaeosaurs by Jonathan Kuo

alphynix:

Newly-described anomalocaridid Lyrarapax unguispinus. Just 12cm long (4.7in), the fossils of this 520 million-year-old Chinese species have exquisitely-preserved brains — the structure of which help to confirm a shared ancestry with velvet worms and basal arthropods.

All the reference images I could find focus on the underside of Lyrarapax, so this reconstruction is pretty speculative regarding the head shield shape and possible dorsal flaps.

And while the brain discovery is really neat, look at those flippers! While Schinderhannes looks like an anomalocaridid trying to be a fish, Lyrarapax almost looks like one trying to be a penguin.

heythereuniverse:

The Great Dying: Explosive Microbial Growth Caused Earth’s Greatest Extinction Event | The Daily Galaxy

The physical environment can produce sudden shocks to the life of our planet through impacting space rocks, erupting volcanoes and other events. But sometimes life itself turns the tables and strikes a swift blow back to the environment. MIT researchers have identified a different culprit — one coming from biology rather than geology. They argue that the carbon disruption and, consequently, the end-Permian extinction were set off by a particular microorganism that evolved a new way to digest organic material into methane.

The end-Permian (or PT) extinction event occurred 252 million years ago. It is often called the Great Dying because around 90 percent of marine species disappeared in one fell swoop. Similar numbers died on land as well, producing a stark contrast between Permian rock layers beneath (or before) the extinction and the Triassic layers above. Extinctions are common throughout time, but for this one, the fossil record truly skipped a beat.
"The end-Permian is the greatest extinction event that we know of," said Daniel Rothman, a geophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “The changes in the fossil record were obvious even to 19th Century geologists.”

[Link to the original paper]
[Read more]
[Photo 1 Credit] [Photo 2 Credit]
heythereuniverse:

The Great Dying: Explosive Microbial Growth Caused Earth’s Greatest Extinction Event | The Daily Galaxy

The physical environment can produce sudden shocks to the life of our planet through impacting space rocks, erupting volcanoes and other events. But sometimes life itself turns the tables and strikes a swift blow back to the environment. MIT researchers have identified a different culprit — one coming from biology rather than geology. They argue that the carbon disruption and, consequently, the end-Permian extinction were set off by a particular microorganism that evolved a new way to digest organic material into methane.

The end-Permian (or PT) extinction event occurred 252 million years ago. It is often called the Great Dying because around 90 percent of marine species disappeared in one fell swoop. Similar numbers died on land as well, producing a stark contrast between Permian rock layers beneath (or before) the extinction and the Triassic layers above. Extinctions are common throughout time, but for this one, the fossil record truly skipped a beat.
"The end-Permian is the greatest extinction event that we know of," said Daniel Rothman, a geophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “The changes in the fossil record were obvious even to 19th Century geologists.”

[Link to the original paper]
[Read more]
[Photo 1 Credit] [Photo 2 Credit]
heythereuniverse:

The Great Dying: Explosive Microbial Growth Caused Earth’s Greatest Extinction Event | The Daily Galaxy

The physical environment can produce sudden shocks to the life of our planet through impacting space rocks, erupting volcanoes and other events. But sometimes life itself turns the tables and strikes a swift blow back to the environment. MIT researchers have identified a different culprit — one coming from biology rather than geology. They argue that the carbon disruption and, consequently, the end-Permian extinction were set off by a particular microorganism that evolved a new way to digest organic material into methane.

The end-Permian (or PT) extinction event occurred 252 million years ago. It is often called the Great Dying because around 90 percent of marine species disappeared in one fell swoop. Similar numbers died on land as well, producing a stark contrast between Permian rock layers beneath (or before) the extinction and the Triassic layers above. Extinctions are common throughout time, but for this one, the fossil record truly skipped a beat.
"The end-Permian is the greatest extinction event that we know of," said Daniel Rothman, a geophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “The changes in the fossil record were obvious even to 19th Century geologists.”

[Link to the original paper]
[Read more]
[Photo 1 Credit] [Photo 2 Credit]

heythereuniverse:

The Great Dying: Explosive Microbial Growth Caused Earth’s Greatest Extinction Event | The Daily Galaxy

The physical environment can produce sudden shocks to the life of our planet through impacting space rocks, erupting volcanoes and other events. But sometimes life itself turns the tables and strikes a swift blow back to the environment. MIT researchers have identified a different culprit — one coming from biology rather than geology. They argue that the carbon disruption and, consequently, the end-Permian extinction were set off by a particular microorganism that evolved a new way to digest organic material into methane.

The end-Permian (or PT) extinction event occurred 252 million years ago. It is often called the Great Dying because around 90 percent of marine species disappeared in one fell swoop. Similar numbers died on land as well, producing a stark contrast between Permian rock layers beneath (or before) the extinction and the Triassic layers above. Extinctions are common throughout time, but for this one, the fossil record truly skipped a beat.

"The end-Permian is the greatest extinction event that we know of," said Daniel Rothman, a geophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “The changes in the fossil record were obvious even to 19th Century geologists.”

[Link to the original paper]

[Read more]

[Photo 1 Credit[Photo 2 Credit]