drhoz:

Australian Emperor, Anax papuensis, aka Hemianax papuensis.
Success, Perth
drhoz:

Australian Emperor, Anax papuensis, aka Hemianax papuensis.
Success, Perth
drhoz:

Australian Emperor, Anax papuensis, aka Hemianax papuensis.
Success, Perth
drhoz:

Australian Emperor, Anax papuensis, aka Hemianax papuensis.
Success, Perth
drhoz:

Australian Emperor, Anax papuensis, aka Hemianax papuensis.
Success, Perth
drhoz:

Australian Emperor, Anax papuensis, aka Hemianax papuensis.
Success, Perth
drhoz:

Australian Emperor, Anax papuensis, aka Hemianax papuensis.
Success, Perth
drhoz:

Australian Emperor, Anax papuensis, aka Hemianax papuensis.
Success, Perth
drhoz:

Australian Emperor, Anax papuensis, aka Hemianax papuensis.
Success, Perth

drhoz:

Australian Emperor, Anax papuensis, aka Hemianax papuensis.

Success, Perth

tassietyger:

birdsflyingbackwards:

Pangolin foetus

Source

It is interesting that they look not unlike those (fetuses) of dogs, cats, hyenas and bears. After all they are all related!

lotsofbirds:

Pink-headed Duck (Rhodonessa caryophyllacea)

Former Distribution: India, Bangladesh and Myanmar

IUCN Status: Critically Endangered, Presumed extinct 1950s

Learn more }

blastedheath:

Ilya Bolotowsky (American/Russian, 1907-1981), Yellow Tondo, 1981. Acrylic on canvas, diameter: 39 1/2 in. (100.3 cm.)

dragontonguespodcast:

Wiwaxia may just be the strangest animal to have roamed the Cambrian seas of the Burgess Shale. Resembling something out of a Metroid game, this primitive mollusc is mostly known through isolated fossils of its hard, carbonaceous scales. However, paleontologists have found enough complete specimens of Wiwaxia to understand how the animal changed as it aged — growing larger, changing its shape, and sprouting two rows of blade-like defensive spikes. 
Top image: Fossil of an adult Wiwaxia at the ROM. (source)
Bottom images: Computer models of the growth stages of Wiwaxia. Clockwise from top left: a juvenile, an adolescent, and an adult. (source)
dragontonguespodcast:

Wiwaxia may just be the strangest animal to have roamed the Cambrian seas of the Burgess Shale. Resembling something out of a Metroid game, this primitive mollusc is mostly known through isolated fossils of its hard, carbonaceous scales. However, paleontologists have found enough complete specimens of Wiwaxia to understand how the animal changed as it aged — growing larger, changing its shape, and sprouting two rows of blade-like defensive spikes. 
Top image: Fossil of an adult Wiwaxia at the ROM. (source)
Bottom images: Computer models of the growth stages of Wiwaxia. Clockwise from top left: a juvenile, an adolescent, and an adult. (source)
dragontonguespodcast:

Wiwaxia may just be the strangest animal to have roamed the Cambrian seas of the Burgess Shale. Resembling something out of a Metroid game, this primitive mollusc is mostly known through isolated fossils of its hard, carbonaceous scales. However, paleontologists have found enough complete specimens of Wiwaxia to understand how the animal changed as it aged — growing larger, changing its shape, and sprouting two rows of blade-like defensive spikes. 
Top image: Fossil of an adult Wiwaxia at the ROM. (source)
Bottom images: Computer models of the growth stages of Wiwaxia. Clockwise from top left: a juvenile, an adolescent, and an adult. (source)
dragontonguespodcast:

Wiwaxia may just be the strangest animal to have roamed the Cambrian seas of the Burgess Shale. Resembling something out of a Metroid game, this primitive mollusc is mostly known through isolated fossils of its hard, carbonaceous scales. However, paleontologists have found enough complete specimens of Wiwaxia to understand how the animal changed as it aged — growing larger, changing its shape, and sprouting two rows of blade-like defensive spikes. 
Top image: Fossil of an adult Wiwaxia at the ROM. (source)
Bottom images: Computer models of the growth stages of Wiwaxia. Clockwise from top left: a juvenile, an adolescent, and an adult. (source)

dragontonguespodcast:

Wiwaxia may just be the strangest animal to have roamed the Cambrian seas of the Burgess Shale. Resembling something out of a Metroid game, this primitive mollusc is mostly known through isolated fossils of its hard, carbonaceous scales. However, paleontologists have found enough complete specimens of Wiwaxia to understand how the animal changed as it aged — growing larger, changing its shape, and sprouting two rows of blade-like defensive spikes. 

Top image: Fossil of an adult Wiwaxia at the ROM. (source)

Bottom images: Computer models of the growth stages of Wiwaxia. Clockwise from top left: a juvenile, an adolescent, and an adult. (source)

spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com
spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com
spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com
spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com
spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com
spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com
spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com
spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com
spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com

spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com

whatjanesaw:

Christian Guatier’s photography where science meets art
whatjanesaw:

Christian Guatier’s photography where science meets art

whatjanesaw:

Christian Guatier’s photography where science meets art

Sept. 1 3:42 pm

justice4mikebrown:

libutron:

Ringed Caecilian - Siphonops annulatus
This creature is not a worm or a snake (though it seems), but an amphibian, and more precisely a caecilian scientifically named Siphonops annulatus (Gymnophiona - Caeciliidae), a species widely distributed through tropical South America.
Siphonops annulatus measures 286-450 mm in total length. Its eyes are small, vestigial but externally visible (the light blue stain in the top photo). A bit down and left of the eye is a tiny tentacle (whitish colored). This species has a cylindrical body with annular grooves that completely encircle the body. 
The Ringed Caecilian exhibits an unusual form of parental care known as maternal dermatophagy, where the offspring consume maternal skin for nourishment. Attending mothers have specialized skin, enriched in lipids. Offspring have specialized dentition.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©craw.craw | Locality: Panguana Reserve, Puerto Inca, Huánuco, Peru (2007) | [Top] - [Bottom]
libutron:

Ringed Caecilian - Siphonops annulatus
This creature is not a worm or a snake (though it seems), but an amphibian, and more precisely a caecilian scientifically named Siphonops annulatus (Gymnophiona - Caeciliidae), a species widely distributed through tropical South America.
Siphonops annulatus measures 286-450 mm in total length. Its eyes are small, vestigial but externally visible (the light blue stain in the top photo). A bit down and left of the eye is a tiny tentacle (whitish colored). This species has a cylindrical body with annular grooves that completely encircle the body. 
The Ringed Caecilian exhibits an unusual form of parental care known as maternal dermatophagy, where the offspring consume maternal skin for nourishment. Attending mothers have specialized skin, enriched in lipids. Offspring have specialized dentition.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©craw.craw | Locality: Panguana Reserve, Puerto Inca, Huánuco, Peru (2007) | [Top] - [Bottom]

libutron:

Ringed Caecilian - Siphonops annulatus

This creature is not a worm or a snake (though it seems), but an amphibian, and more precisely a caecilian scientifically named Siphonops annulatus (Gymnophiona - Caeciliidae), a species widely distributed through tropical South America.

Siphonops annulatus measures 286-450 mm in total length. Its eyes are small, vestigial but externally visible (the light blue stain in the top photo). A bit down and left of the eye is a tiny tentacle (whitish colored). This species has a cylindrical body with annular grooves that completely encircle the body.

The Ringed Caecilian exhibits an unusual form of parental care known as maternal dermatophagy, where the offspring consume maternal skin for nourishment. Attending mothers have specialized skin, enriched in lipids. Offspring have specialized dentition.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©craw.craw | Locality: Panguana Reserve, Puerto Inca, Huánuco, Peru (2007) | [Top] - [Bottom]

silviya7:

I was bored, so I decided to do a little Babylon 5 fanart speedpaint of a Shadow ship.  I’ve actually never drawn space scapes before, so that took a while to figure out.  I love how vibrant and colorful space was in B5.  

"What do you want?"

pangurbanthewhite:

chikaderp:

wildunicornherd:

thinksquad:

Here is a Science fair project presented by a girl in a secondary school in Sussex . In it she took filtered water and divided it into two parts. The first part she heated to boiling in a pan on the stove, and the second part she heated to boiling in a microwave. Then after cooling she used the water to water two identical plants to see if there would be any difference in the growth between the normal boiled water and the water boiled in a microwave. She was thinking that the structure or energy of the water may be compromised by microwave. As it turned out, even she was amazed at the difference, after the experiment which was repeated by her class mates a number of times and had the same result.

It has been known for some years that the problem with microwaved anything is not the radiation people used to worry about, it’s how it corrupts the DNA in the food so the body can not recognize it.

Microwaves don’t work different ways on different substances. Whatever you put into the microwave suffers the same destructive process. Microwaves agitate the molecules to move faster and faster. This movement causes friction which denatures the original make-up of the substance. It results in destroyed vitamins, minerals, proteins and generates the new stuff called radiolytic compounds, things that are not found in nature.

So the body wraps it in fat cells to protect itself from the dead food or it eliminates it fast. Think of all the Mothers heating up milk in these ‘Safe’ appliances. What about the nurse in Canada that warmed up blood for a transfusion patient and accidentally killed him when the blood went in dead. But the makers say it’s safe. But proof is in the pictures of living plants dying!

NO, YOU PIG-IGNORANT ASSWIPES.

SOME KID’S CLASS PROJECT IS NOT REAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH. YOU’VE HEARD OF “DOUBLE BLIND”, RIGHT? CALL ME WHEN IT’S PUBLISHED IN NATURE.

the structure or energy of the water

what the fuck does that even mean you realize that a water molecule is made up of three fucking atoms and if you rearrange it it isn’t water anymore and you would fucking notice

the problem with microwaved anything is not the radiation people used to worry about

Here is a handy diagram I drew of all the different types of radiation:

The Electromagnetic Spectrum Cheat Sheet

Microwaves != nuclear reactors, so calm your tits.

it’s how it corrupts the DNA in the food so the body can not recognize it

…do you understand what DNA is and how eating works? DNA is a jumble of protein in the middle of each cell and it tells the cells in that particular organism how to make more cells. Your body does not care about whether your food has any DNA in it or not. The chemicals it cares about are things like vitamins and sugars, as well as inorganic shit like salt.

(You can denature DNA by heating it or using chemicals like urea. It is like what happens when you fry an egg, which is basically a big glob of protein—the strands break apart and it looks like tiny white strings. Very cool.)

Microwaves agitate the molecules to move faster and faster.

I…just…that is the fucking definition of heat, whether you’re heating something over a flame or in a microwave or using the Sun. The difference is that microwaves mostly affect the water molecules in your food and they don’t need to use as much heat. Water boils at 100°C, which is just about as hot as water can get before it just turns into steam; but that’s like the lowest setting on your oven. Oven- or stove-cooked food tastes different partly because it uses higher temperatures and partly because heat is transferred in a different way.

This movement causes friction

That’s not what friction is.

It results in destroyed vitamins, minerals, proteins and generates the new stuff called radiolytic compounds, things that are not found in nature.

Let’s take these one at a time.

  • Vitamins are classified as water-soluble or fat-soluble. So cooking things in water will dissolve the water-soluble vitamins (C and all the B’s). Just plain heat doesn’t do that, so microwaving veggies—which keeps the water in—is actually a healthier option.
  • Proteins: Breaking the chemical bonds in proteins (denaturing) is a part of any cooking. However, denatured protein is still nutritious—that’s why you can meet your protein intake with foods like fried eggs and baked chicken.
  • Minerals are just chemical elements, like off the periodic table—sodium, iron, potassium. (Vitamins and proteins are very complex combinations of elements.)

Which brings me to the “radiolytic compound” bullshit. When you talk about breaking apart, say, iron—you’re talking about breaking down the iron atoms themselves. Which is a whole lot different than breaking the bonds between atoms. It takes hella radiation. You need shit like gamma rays—the OOOH SCARY NUCULAR radiation—which we’ve already established do not come from your microwave.

things that are not found in nature

What the shit does that even mean? You all know radioactive elements occur in nature, right? In rocks and also in living cells. That’s right, you have this radioactive kind of carbon INSIDE YOU. You get it by eating those delicious plants. We can tell how long ago something died by how much of it is left.

Tons of shit that occurs naturally is horribly bad for you. And tons of shit that never existed until we cooked it up is great for you—like the chemical compounds in a lot of medications.

PEOPLE WHO BELIEVE THIS SHIT ARE WHY CHILDHOOD DISEASES THAT CAUSED SERIOUS ILLNESSES AND/OR DEATH THAT WE NEARLY ERADICATED WITH VACCINES ARE NOW COMING BACK AND WHY CONSPIRACY THEORIST TWATS ARE ASKING CITY COUNCIL NOT TO FLUORIDATE THE WATER AND WHY GLOBAL WARMING WILL WRECK OUR FUCKING PLANET.

LERN 2 SCIENCE. Think before you reblog. And microwave your veggies.

This was incredibly amusing to read. Thank you so much for sciencing.

This was a thing of beauty.

apsaravis:

Previews of illustrations for a book about Smok wawelski. I made 5 coloured illustrations, while Jakub drew several with pencil. The book (not printed yet) is written by Grzegorz Niedźwiedzki, who first described Smok.
apsaravis:

Previews of illustrations for a book about Smok wawelski. I made 5 coloured illustrations, while Jakub drew several with pencil. The book (not printed yet) is written by Grzegorz Niedźwiedzki, who first described Smok.

apsaravis:

Previews of illustrations for a book about Smok wawelski. I made 5 coloured illustrations, while Jakub drew several with pencil. The book (not printed yet) is written by Grzegorz Niedźwiedzki, who first described Smok.

libutron:

Basin Treefrog (Rana Lanceolada) - Hypsiboas lanciformis

Hypsiboas lanciformis (Hylidae) is a South American tree frog whose dorsum is distinctive by having transverse dark brown stripes on a dark yellow to light brown background. This species is nocturnal and arboreal, and occurs in the upper Amazon basin in Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Graham Wise | Locality: Arajuno River, Amazon, Ecuador (2013)