frolicingintheforest:

Milkweed Tiger Moth Caterpillar

(Euchaetes egle)

frolicingintheforest:

Emetic Russula
(Russula emetica)

frolicingintheforest:

Emetic Russula
(Russula emetica)

the-uniformium:

Uniforms of the United States Marines 1810-1815

UNIFORM, ENLISTED:

The Marines of 1812 were among the best dressed forces the United States fielded at the time.  They were the ambassadors of American arms that would be seen all over the world as they traveled aboard the ships of the U.S. Navy.  When performing any military duty Marines were to wear a single breasted, Federal Blue, wool coat with scarlet cuffs, turn backs and collar.  On the turn backs were a yellow, worsted wool tape diamond.  On the front of the coat there were eight buttons of the 1797 U.S. Navy design, sometimes called the “common navy button”.  From the button holes angled rows of yellow, worsted wool tape, ending in a “half diamond” created a “V” like pattern.  On the sleeves there are three similar pieces of yellow, worsted wool tape starting at the top of the cuff and extending out from three buttons. Likewise, on the tails of the coat that hang on the hips, there is the same pattern of worsted wool tape extending from three buttons.  On the collar there are two buttons with the worsted wool tape projecting forward towards the opening of the collar.  Also on the collar is a small button with the same naval pattern that receives the epaulette.  The epaulette is also lined with the yellow worsted wool tape and when fastened it holds the accoutrement belts in place on a Marine’s shoulder.  Only the sleeves and the tails are lined and in the lining of the tail there are pockets.

The Marine wore a tall, yeoman pattern felt cap trimmed with a yellow cord and single tassel, brass cap plate, a brass eagle “in place of a cockade” and a red plush plume.  The visor is 2.5 inches long and stiffened by an added piece of leather.  On the back is another piece of black leather attached in the same manner as the one under the brim for the purpose of keeping the powder in the hair from getting onto the cap.

image

A modern reproduction of the Shako prescribed in the 1810 regulations.

The powder came from the Marine’s hair and queue (pronounce simply as “Q”) which they were required to have on and powdered at all times on duty.  If a Marine did not have long enough hair to put into a queue he was required to purchase a false queue himself.  Under the coat the Marine wore a linen or cotton long sleeved shirt with ruffles on the neck line.  On the neck the Marine wore a 2.5 inch leather stock with a brass clasping system.  In the Summer Marines wore white, linen, high wasted, fall front pantaloons/trousers that fit snuggly on the legs but had room in the seat to allow movement.  In the winter, assuming the supply chain was working properly, the linen pantaloons/trousers were replaced by white, woolen overalls.  In both summer and winter uniform Marines wore knee high, black wool gaiters that were fastened with fifteen small naval buttons.

Perhaps the most well known part of the uniform of the Marines of the 1812 Era was the neck stock often pointed out as the reason Marines are called “leathernecks,” but these were not unique to the Marine Corps.  Most soldiers and Marines of the era wore these devices.  The neck stock is a 2.5 in. wide black leather band that fit around the neck of the Marine and was fasten with a copper clasping system. The traditional or mythical reason for these neck stocks has been passed down for generations now.  This was that they were worn to protect the wearer’s neck from sword, knife and bayonet blades.  While this makes a great story it is not accurate.  The true intent of these were to keep the men’s head erect and straight, preventing them from paying too much attention to the action (carnage) all about them and to help them maintain a military posture. Though we will continue to hear the traditional explanation for the neck stock we can now also share the true reason.

Rounding out the uniform was the black, mid height, leather, and straight last military shoe of the period.

UNIFORM, MUSIC:

The uniform worn by United States Marine Corps musics (the name/rank given to drummers, fifers and Marine Band members), was of the same style and cut as the enlisted men‘s with the same tape and buttons upon the coat, but it was in “reverse colors.” Where the enlisted man‘s coat is blue the music‘s is red and vice versa.  This red coat lives today with the President’s Own United States Marine Band as well as the USMC Drum and Bugle Corps.

Other than the reverse colors of the music coat the only other difference in the uniform was the plume on the music’s cap.  It differed in its placement, its color and its material.  The music’s plume was to be a tall feather plume of red and blue feathers and was placed over the left ear.

UNIFORM, NCO:

For the NCO, like the Music, much of the uniform is the same as the enlisted man.  The cut, color scheme and material of the coat are the exact same for the corporals.  The difference is that the corporal wears a yellow shoulder knot, or epaulette, on the right shoulder.  The other difference for the corporal is the substitution of a red feather plume for the plush plume which is worn on the cap in the same location of the enlisted man’s plush plume.

Sergeants have the same color scheme as the enlisted man’s coat but historically their uniforms were made of finer materials.  The sergeant will also wear yellow shoulder knots, or epaulettes, on both shoulders.  The sergeant’s cap will have a red feather plume but will be worn over the left ear with an accompanying black leather cockade.

To date there are no extant Marine Corps documents from the period that show the Marine sergeants of the 1812 era wore a sash.  Evidence shows that they were worn before the major uniform change in 1804 and in periods later than 1826.

frolicingintheforest:

Shiny Cinnamon Polypore
(Coltricia cinnamomea)

rollership:

atomic-flash said:Orgg, The Tax Collector from Space - Tales Of Suspense #33, September 1962. Illustration: Jack Kirby (via Nemojp Dante)

rollership:

atomic-flash said:Orgg, The Tax Collector from Space - Tales Of Suspense #33, September 1962. Illustration: Jack Kirby (via Nemojp Dante)


Predominantly found in Australia, the Letter-winged kite (Elanus scriptus) is a rare raptor. They are the only fully nocturnal raptor, and their soft almost owl-like feathers ensure they can fly quietly and without disturbance.
[x] [x]

Predominantly found in Australia, the Letter-winged kite (Elanus scriptus) is a rare raptor. They are the only fully nocturnal raptor, and their soft almost owl-like feathers ensure they can fly quietly and without disturbance.
[x] [x]

Predominantly found in Australia, the Letter-winged kite (Elanus scriptus) is a rare raptor. They are the only fully nocturnal raptor, and their soft almost owl-like feathers ensure they can fly quietly and without disturbance.

[x] [x]

On Gamers/Gaming:

I don’t really talk much about video games on here, but a recent issue called “Gamergate” has made my habits somewhat more relevant to social issues. I’ve been playing video games since probably before I can remember, all the way back when I’d sit on my dad’s lap at age 3 or 4 and played games like Wolfenstein, Doom, and Descent with him. Once I had the motor skills to play on my own, I played loads of old DOS games. My family wasn’t too rich (to say the least) back in the early 90s so Shareware was a godsend.

Fast forward to today and, with the help of thrifting, garage sales, ebay, and general bargain hunting, I have a pretty vast collection of everything related to video games. I haven’t done a full inventory since 2009, but I’ll estimate that I have well over 50 (different, not counting doubles) consoles and probably over 1,000 games. Whether they’re retro or new, I’ll always enjoy sitting down and blasting through a few levels of something I have lying around. I’ve been playing and collecting video games with more passion and happiness than most people who identify as “Gamers”. I’m not going to lie: Video games have brought me a lot of joy and catharsis, especially in the darkest times of my life.

That being said, I don’t base my identity off of this hobby. I don’t consider myself a “Gamer” because I’m not part of any “Gamer” community where I talk about “Gaming” with other “Gamers”. The 12-year-old who called you a slur on Xbox Live? That’s a “Gamer” to me. The grown man who sends death threats to women in the video game industry? That’s another “Gamer”. They’re a subculture on their own,  priding themselves on elitism, Libertarianism, and Social Darwinism. A majority of them will consider rape and death threats a “Free speech” issue, you don’t get more Libertarian than that.

And another point: You might say that the big problem in “Gaming” might stem from the 12-year-old bigots on Xbox Live. What happens when the 12-year-olds grow up? I remember those kids shouting their crap on games when I was in middle school playing SOCOM 2 and CS: Source. It’s not like the shitty 12-year-olds stay 12 forever. The same group of people who ruined online gaming with their slurs and bigotry, making the mute button obligatory, is trying to maintain the status quo of slurs and bigotry through their support of “Gamergate”.

The way these people solve problems is through being as abrasive, harmful, and disgusting as possible. They don’t understand free speech. They think that you shouldn’t even judge a person by what they say, no matter how bigoted. It doesn’t work that way. First off, harassment is not free speech, it’s harassment. Second off, threats are not free speech, they’re threats. Third, if the only way you can justify your words is by saying you can’t be arrested for saying them, maybe you’re not as benevolent as you think you are.

Frankly, these people are what is wrong with video game culture as a whole and I think that video games wouldn’t be so looked down upon if these assholes would just shut the fuck up. I’m more of a “Gamer” than most of them and yet I wouldn’t touch any of them with a ten-foot-long pole. 

One more thing: The favorite genre of the “Gamer”, the modern FPS, fucking sucks and if you think any of the recent COD games are anywhere even close to Doom-quality, you’re out of your mind. If I play Halo right after I play Doom 2, I feel like Master Chief is wading through waist-deep water. 

svrrealist:

Zoma Baitler (b. Šančiai, Lithuania 1908 - d. Montevideo, Uruguay 1994)

Paris

Oil on canvas, 60 x 80 cm

fripperiesandfobs:

Court coat of Marshal Louis Alexandre Berthier, Prince de Wagram, 1799-1815
From Sotheby’s
fripperiesandfobs:

Court coat of Marshal Louis Alexandre Berthier, Prince de Wagram, 1799-1815
From Sotheby’s

fripperiesandfobs:

Court coat of Marshal Louis Alexandre Berthier, Prince de Wagram, 1799-1815

From Sotheby’s

underthescopemin:

Titanite

Excellent lustrous rich green crystals of Titanite admirably cover the display face of the specimen.  Many of the Titanite crystals are wedge shaped twins mostly gemmy to translucent. A diagonal zone of very deep green crystallized Chlorite runs across the specimen, and also some further areas. The matrix is a banded Chloritic/Feldspar rock, with scattered crystals of Pyrite. 

Sophisticated 600-Year-Old Canoe Discovered in New Zealand

archaeologicalnews:

image

Sophisticated ocean going canoes and favorable winds may have helped early human settlers colonize New Zealand, a pair of new studies shows.

The remote archipelagos of East Polynesia were among the last habitable places on Earth that humans were able to colonize. In New Zealand, human history only began around 1200-1300, when intrepid voyagers arrived by boat through several journeys over some generations.

A piece of that early heritage was recently revealed on a beach in New Zealand, when a 600-year-old canoe with a turtle carved on its hull emerged from a sand dune after a harsh storm. The researchers who examined the shipwreck say the vessel is more impressive than any other canoe previously linked to this period in New Zealand. Read more.