descentintotyranny:

Screw the national anthem

After what happened in Ferguson, I can’t pretend the promise of that song extends to a black man like me

Sep. 30 2014

I hit a basketball game the other day. Hundreds packed into the stands and around the court as the DJ silenced the music. A bouncy, colorful dude approached center-court and requested that we stand for the national anthem. A delicate teenage Whitney Houston type approached the mic.

Everyone popped up ⎯ blacks and whites alike, all with straight backs and erect necks ⎯ their right palms Velcroed to their hearts. Military silence blanketed the crowd as the little girl blessed us all with her voice.

I stayed seated and just played on my iPhone during her entire performance. Some people looked at me, I yawned in their direction, stretched in my seat and looked back at them. I was itching for someone to say something stupid like, “Pay some respect. Stand for the anthem.” So I could’ve broke my mug down and yelled, “Man, fuck you and the anthem!”

I would’ve proudly hollered that at the top of my lungs because obviously I don’t fit the mold. Even though I was born in America and my ancestors built its infrastructure for free ⎯ I’m not a part of the “Our” when they sing, “Our flag was still there!” I feel like the “Our” doesn’t include blacks, most women, gays, trans and poor people of all colors.

And sadly our nation reminds us every day.

Some may reject the anthem because Francis Scott Key sang for freedom while enslaving blacks. His hatred even bled into the lyrics of the elongated version of “The Star Spangled Banner” you won’t hear at a sporting event. The third stanza reads …

“No refuge could save the hireling and slave, From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave”

That line was basically a shot at the slaves who agreed to fight with the British in exchange for their freedom. Who wouldn’t want freedom, and how could he not understand them opting out for a better life?

A life free of mass whippings, rape and unpaid labor. Andrew Jackson caught wind of slaves agreeing to fight with the British in exchange for freedom and made a similar promise to thousands of slaves in Louisiana. He told them if they protected Louisiana, they could be free after the war. Well, we won the war, and then Jackson reneged on the deal. He went on to be president while the brave Africans who fought with honor went back into servitude.

Read More

scipak:

The Genome of the Canola Oil Plant

Scientists have sequenced the genome of the plant that gives us canola oil, Brassica napus, and their work reveals insights into the evolution of such plants (which have chromosomes derived from multiple species), as well as the role their evolution plays in agriculture. B. napus was cultivated over 7,000 years ago for oil, food and fodder. It is adapted to many different climate zones, and it also produces high seed oil content and low amounts of undesirable chemicals called glucosinolates that cause toxins to build in animal feed. To explore how allopolyploid evolution of this plant contributed to its value in agriculture, Boulos Chaloub and colleagues assembled a draft sequence of B. napus. They observed that the B. rapa and B. oleracea sub-components continuously exchange corresponding genetic material. Some of these gene conversion events appear to have been selected by humans as part of crop improvement, the researchers say.

Read more about this research from the 22 August issue of Science here.

[Image © Jean Weber, INRA. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

amnhnyc:

New Research: Fossils of New Squirrel-like Species Support Earlier Origin of Mammals
A research team led by paleontologists at the American Museum of Natural History and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have described three new small squirrel-like species that place a poorly understood Mesozoic group of animals firmly in the mammal family tree. The study, published today in the journal Nature, supports the idea that mammals originated at least 208 million years ago in the late Triassic, much earlier than some previous research suggests.
The three new species—Shenshou lui, Xianshou linglong, and Xianshou songae—are described from six nearly complete 160-million-year-old fossils found in China. The animals, which researchers have placed in a new group, or clade, called Euharamiyida, likely looked similar to small squirrels. They weighed between 1 and 10 ounces and had tails and feet that indicate that they were tree dwellers.
Based on the age of the Euharamiyida species and their kin, the divergence of mammals from reptiles had to have happened much earlier than some research has estimated. Instead of originating in the middle Jurassic (between 176 and 161 million years ago), mammals likely first appeared in the late Triassic (between 235 and 201 million years ago).
Read the full story. 
amnhnyc:

New Research: Fossils of New Squirrel-like Species Support Earlier Origin of Mammals
A research team led by paleontologists at the American Museum of Natural History and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have described three new small squirrel-like species that place a poorly understood Mesozoic group of animals firmly in the mammal family tree. The study, published today in the journal Nature, supports the idea that mammals originated at least 208 million years ago in the late Triassic, much earlier than some previous research suggests.
The three new species—Shenshou lui, Xianshou linglong, and Xianshou songae—are described from six nearly complete 160-million-year-old fossils found in China. The animals, which researchers have placed in a new group, or clade, called Euharamiyida, likely looked similar to small squirrels. They weighed between 1 and 10 ounces and had tails and feet that indicate that they were tree dwellers.
Based on the age of the Euharamiyida species and their kin, the divergence of mammals from reptiles had to have happened much earlier than some research has estimated. Instead of originating in the middle Jurassic (between 176 and 161 million years ago), mammals likely first appeared in the late Triassic (between 235 and 201 million years ago).
Read the full story. 
amnhnyc:

New Research: Fossils of New Squirrel-like Species Support Earlier Origin of Mammals
A research team led by paleontologists at the American Museum of Natural History and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have described three new small squirrel-like species that place a poorly understood Mesozoic group of animals firmly in the mammal family tree. The study, published today in the journal Nature, supports the idea that mammals originated at least 208 million years ago in the late Triassic, much earlier than some previous research suggests.
The three new species—Shenshou lui, Xianshou linglong, and Xianshou songae—are described from six nearly complete 160-million-year-old fossils found in China. The animals, which researchers have placed in a new group, or clade, called Euharamiyida, likely looked similar to small squirrels. They weighed between 1 and 10 ounces and had tails and feet that indicate that they were tree dwellers.
Based on the age of the Euharamiyida species and their kin, the divergence of mammals from reptiles had to have happened much earlier than some research has estimated. Instead of originating in the middle Jurassic (between 176 and 161 million years ago), mammals likely first appeared in the late Triassic (between 235 and 201 million years ago).
Read the full story. 

amnhnyc:

New Research: Fossils of New Squirrel-like Species Support Earlier Origin of Mammals

A research team led by paleontologists at the American Museum of Natural History and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have described three new small squirrel-like species that place a poorly understood Mesozoic group of animals firmly in the mammal family tree. The study, published today in the journal Nature, supports the idea that mammals originated at least 208 million years ago in the late Triassic, much earlier than some previous research suggests.

The three new species—Shenshou lui, Xianshou linglong, and Xianshou songae—are described from six nearly complete 160-million-year-old fossils found in China. The animals, which researchers have placed in a new group, or clade, called Euharamiyida, likely looked similar to small squirrels. They weighed between 1 and 10 ounces and had tails and feet that indicate that they were tree dwellers.

Based on the age of the Euharamiyida species and their kin, the divergence of mammals from reptiles had to have happened much earlier than some research has estimated. Instead of originating in the middle Jurassic (between 176 and 161 million years ago), mammals likely first appeared in the late Triassic (between 235 and 201 million years ago).

Read the full story. 

lotsofbirds:

Blue Crane (Anthropoides paradiseus)

Distribution: Southern Africa

IUCN Status: Vulnerable

Ecology } { Vocalizations } { eBird }

(Photo by Blake Matheson // CC 2.0)

astronomy-to-zoology:

Libelloides macaronius
…is a species of Ascalaphine (Split-eyed) owlfly which occurs throughout parts of Europe and Asia. Like other owlflies L. macaronius is an insectivore and will feed on a variety of flying insects. L. macaronius larvae, on the other hand, are antlion-like ambush predators. 
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Neuroptera-Ascalaphidae-Libelloides-L. macaronius
Images: Sebaho and Srđan Mitić
astronomy-to-zoology:

Libelloides macaronius
…is a species of Ascalaphine (Split-eyed) owlfly which occurs throughout parts of Europe and Asia. Like other owlflies L. macaronius is an insectivore and will feed on a variety of flying insects. L. macaronius larvae, on the other hand, are antlion-like ambush predators. 
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Neuroptera-Ascalaphidae-Libelloides-L. macaronius
Images: Sebaho and Srđan Mitić

astronomy-to-zoology:

Libelloides macaronius

…is a species of Ascalaphine (Split-eyed) owlfly which occurs throughout parts of Europe and Asia. Like other owlflies L. macaronius is an insectivore and will feed on a variety of flying insects. L. macaronius larvae, on the other hand, are antlion-like ambush predators. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Neuroptera-Ascalaphidae-Libelloides-L. macaronius

Images: Sebaho and Srđan Mitić

fuckyeahungulates:

Springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis)

Formatio Verborum Latinorum / Formation of Latin Words

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

palaeoverse:

interretialia:

Παχυρινόσαυρος -ου / Pachyrhinosaurus -i m. “Pachyrhinosaurus”
  [παχύς “thick” + ῥίς “nose” + σαῦρος “lizard”]
  [παχυ- + ῥιν- + σαυρο-] stems
  [παχυριν- + σαυρο-] new stem and stem
  [παχυρινο- + σαυρο-] with Connecting Vowel ο
  [Παχυρινοσαυρο-] new stem
  [Παχυρινόσαυρος] nominative singular
  [Pachyrhinosaurus] Παχυρινόσαυρος Latinized

image

(Fons Imaginis.)

More of interretialia's great dinosaurs!

Aww yes! I love etymology!

And as a bonus: P. canadensis - Canadian thick nosed lizard

P. lakustai - Al Lakusta’s thick nosed lizard

P. perotorum - Ross Perot’s thick nosed lizard

dendroica:

Fall colors in eastern United States and Canada by NASA Goddard Photo and Video on Flickr.

As temperatures dropped and daylight began to shorten, autumn colors began to wash over the deciduous forests of North America. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured this true-color image of the northeastern United States and Canada on September 27, 2014.

Washes of orange, brown and yellow are brightest in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, upstate New York, New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, and southern Quebec and Ontario. Also, faint traces of phytoplankton blooms can be seen in the offshore waters of the Atlantic Ocean. The transition of autumn leaves from green, to glowing with colors, to browning and dropping to the ground, involve several complex interactions and reactions.

However, length of sunlight and the temperature changes are dominant factors. Topography also plays a role, as does latitude. Temperature tends to drop faster at higher elevations and at higher latitudes, and day length shortens more quickly at higher latitudes. Color change tends to begin in the north and sweep southward, and change begins at mountain tops then moves into valleys.

As explained by the U.S. Forest Service, certain species of trees produce certain colors. Oaks generally turn red, brown, or russet; hickories become golden bronze; aspen and yellow-poplar turn golden. Maples differ by species. Red maple turns brilliant scarlet; sugar maple, orange-red; and black maple, yellow. Leaves of some trees, such as elms, simply become brown.

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

craigpeterlow:

Doe and fawn on Robert Moses State Park Beach, Fire Island, NY.

I need to go to this beautiful place more often. So close to my home and yet the last time I visited was January.

astronomy-to-zoology:

Phazaca leucocera

…is a species of Uraniid moth which occurs in Sri Lanka, southern India, China, Borneo and the Solomon Islands. Phazaca luecocera larvae are known to feed on Canthium spp. Intrestingly they will typically rest on the underside of old leaves but will only feed on young leaves.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Uraniidae-Phazaca-P. leucocera

Image: L. Shyamal

cyan-biologist:

16. A Phyllorhiza punctata (Floating Bell,Australian spotted jellyfish or the white-spotted jellyfish)for allthestrings​ 

I’m really proud of this one, I love drawing Cnidaria

Just 3 more to go!

madddscience:

Frank Kelly Freas, 1974

"I think, when one has been angry for a very long time, one gets used to it. And it becomes comfortable like…like old leather. And finally… it becomes so familiar that one can’t remember feeling any other way."
Jean-Luc Picard