A message from sylph0fl1ght
Oh hey you're back! How've you been?

Not bad! I’ve been chillin’ out, working on my tan. I started reading “Game of Thrones” and I’ve been enjoying it so far.

Playing Super Nintendo as well. That’s always nice. 8)

apsaravis:

Smok wawelski
Work in progress…

apsaravis:

Smok wawelski

Work in progress…

libutron:

Cystoderma fallax

Cystoderma fallax (Agaricaceae) is an inedible mushroom identified macroscopically by its rusty-orange to cinnamon color, the granulose coating on cap and stem, whitish gills that are attached to the stem, and prominent ring.

The species occurs in North America and Europe.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©MaKeR i | Locality: unknown

Where is Jessica Hyde?

libutron:

Wolf’s Milk Slime  (Toothpaste Slime)

Fruiting bodies (scientifically named aethalia) of the plasmodial slime mold Lycogala epidendrum are quite distinctive by its little, round, reddish pink balls, which exude a pinkish orange paste when popped. This cosmopolitan slime mold grows in groups on dead wood, especially large logs. 

[Mycetozoa - Myxomycetes - Liceales - Tubiferaceae - LycogalaLycogala epidendrum (L.) Fr., 1829]

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©MaKeR i | Locality: unknown

dendroica:

Brown-belted Bumble Bee, Bombus griseocollis (by Dendroica cerulea)

Oh, they also messed with the lights that illuminate the flags.

The flags are like 20 feet by 11 feet.

But seriously, why the white flags on the Brooklyn Bridge today? Not just plain white flags, but washed-out United States flags. Something strange going on in terms of vexillology.

griseus:

A redeye gaper (Chaunax sp.) venting water at 240 meters depth. Seen during the Lophelia II 2008 expedition at the Green Canyon site in the Gulf of Mexico.
Gapers are Lophiiformes, in the anglerfish group, with big heads, a network of open sensory canals,and a lateral canal extending posteriorly along a compressed trunk and tail. They are sit-and-wait, ambush predators
Video courtesy of Lophelia II 2008: Deepwater Coral Expedition: Reefs, Rigs, and Wrecks.
griseus:

A redeye gaper (Chaunax sp.) venting water at 240 meters depth. Seen during the Lophelia II 2008 expedition at the Green Canyon site in the Gulf of Mexico.
Gapers are Lophiiformes, in the anglerfish group, with big heads, a network of open sensory canals,and a lateral canal extending posteriorly along a compressed trunk and tail. They are sit-and-wait, ambush predators
Video courtesy of Lophelia II 2008: Deepwater Coral Expedition: Reefs, Rigs, and Wrecks.

griseus:

A redeye gaper (Chaunax sp.) venting water at 240 meters depth. Seen during the Lophelia II 2008 expedition at the Green Canyon site in the Gulf of Mexico.

Gapers are Lophiiformes, in the anglerfish group, with big heads, a network of open sensory canals,and a lateral canal extending posteriorly along a compressed trunk and tail. They are sit-and-wait, ambush predators

Archaeologists Uncover Lost Population of Ancient Amarna

archaeologicalnews:

image

It remained a mystery for decades.

Since archaeologist F.Ll. Griffith’s excavations in the 1920’s at the ancient site of the pharaoh Akhenaten’s short-lived new capital city of Akhetaten (modern Amarna), archaeologists have been puzzled about the whereabouts of the remains of the city’s commoner population – the people who toiled to build and maintain Akhenaten’s sacred edifices and infrastructure — and more specifically, the estimated 6,000 people who died during the short 15-year period of the city’s construction and development.

“A will-of-the-wisp, the dream of a rich unplundered cemetery of the middle classes at El-Amarneh, full of choice vases and amulets, beckons to each successive explorer,” wrote Griffith in the report for his 1923 excavation season.* Read more.

libutron:

Slime mold on mushroom 

Tiny fruiting bodies (sporocarps) of the cosmopolitan slime mold Cribraria, maybe Cribraria intricata (Cribrariaceae), growing on the cap of an unidentified mushroom. There’s also Ceratiomyxa slime mold below the fungus.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo: ©Kim Fleming

Locality: unknown

scienthusiasts:

Clathrus archeri, commonly known as Octopus Stinkhorn or Devil’s Fingers, is a type of fungus that is native to Australia and Tasmania. It begins its life in a sub-erumpent egg, then erupts into four to seven elongated slender arms initially erect and attached at the top, which eventually unfold to reveal the spore-containing gleba. In its mature stage, it gives off a foul odor, hence its classification in the stinkhorn family, or the Phallaceae. The smelly spores attract flies and other insects, which contribute to the dispersal process.
Source: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4
scienthusiasts:

Clathrus archeri, commonly known as Octopus Stinkhorn or Devil’s Fingers, is a type of fungus that is native to Australia and Tasmania. It begins its life in a sub-erumpent egg, then erupts into four to seven elongated slender arms initially erect and attached at the top, which eventually unfold to reveal the spore-containing gleba. In its mature stage, it gives off a foul odor, hence its classification in the stinkhorn family, or the Phallaceae. The smelly spores attract flies and other insects, which contribute to the dispersal process.
Source: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4
scienthusiasts:

Clathrus archeri, commonly known as Octopus Stinkhorn or Devil’s Fingers, is a type of fungus that is native to Australia and Tasmania. It begins its life in a sub-erumpent egg, then erupts into four to seven elongated slender arms initially erect and attached at the top, which eventually unfold to reveal the spore-containing gleba. In its mature stage, it gives off a foul odor, hence its classification in the stinkhorn family, or the Phallaceae. The smelly spores attract flies and other insects, which contribute to the dispersal process.
Source: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4

scienthusiasts:

Clathrus archeri, commonly known as Octopus Stinkhorn or Devil’s Fingers, is a type of fungus that is native to Australia and Tasmania. It begins its life in a sub-erumpent egg, then erupts into four to seven elongated slender arms initially erect and attached at the top, which eventually unfold to reveal the spore-containing gleba. In its mature stage, it gives off a foul odor, hence its classification in the stinkhorn family, or the Phallaceae. The smelly spores attract flies and other insects, which contribute to the dispersal process.

Source: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4

libutron:

Arrhenia chlorocyanea

Arrhenia chlorocyanea (Tricholomataceae) is a rare species of mushroom characterized by its blackish green color with bluish hue when moist. When mature this fungus turns slightly opalescent and finally yellow-brown, almost without greenish tinges.

This mushroom occurs in Europe and North America (Canada and the United States), but apparently is very rare.

Synonyms: Clitocybe atroviridis, Omphalina viridis

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©MaKeR i | Locality: unknown

A message from Anonymous
If you had the chance to be eaten by any synapsid, which one would you prefer to be devoured by? Why?

Hm, weird question. So I’ll give you a weird answer.

I’d elect to be shrunken down to like an inch or two tall and get swallowed whole by a woman I find attractive.

Humans are technically synapsids, after all.